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Cultural Transfers in Dispute

Representations in Asia, Europe and the Arab World since the Middle Ages, Eigene und Fremde Welten 23

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Bibliografische Daten
ISBN/EAN: 9783593394046
Sprache: Englisch
Umfang: 335 S., 2 Farbfotos, 2 sw-Abb.
Auflage: 1. Auflage 2011
Einband: Paperback

Beschreibung

InhaltsangabeContents Acknowledgments. 7 Foreword: Representations and Transfers. 9 Hartmut Kaelble Cultural Transfers in Dispute: An Introduction. 15 Jörg Feuchter The Middle Ages: Representations of Transfers between Islam and Christianity Jewish or Islamic Influence? The Iconoclastic Controversy in Dispute. 41 Wolfram Drews Did the Medieval West Receive a 'Complete Model' of Education from Classical Islam? Reconsidering George Makdisi and His Thesis. 61 Tim Geelhaar Emperor Frederick II, 'Sultan of Lucera', 'Friend of the Muslims', Promoter of Cultural Transfer: Controversies and Suggestions. 85 Dorothea Weltecke Medieval Western Perceptions of Islam and the Scholars: What Went Wrong?. 107 Kristin Skottki Does the History of Medieval Political Thought Need a Spatial Turn? The Murals of Longthorpe, the Secretum secretorum and the Intercultural Transfer of Political Ideas in the High Middle Ages. 135 Bee Yun Between 'Core' and 'Periphery': Representations of Transfers of Fascism, Violence, and Law Western Representations of Fascist Influences on Islamist Thought. 149 JosephSimon Görlach Transfers, Formations, Transformations? Some Programmatic Notes on Fascism in India, c. 1922-1938. 167 Benjamin Zachariah Colonialism and Violence: Alleged Transfers and Political Instrumentalisation. 193 Andreas Weiß Legal Authenticity, Cultural Insulation and Undemocratic Rule: AbdalRazzaq Ahmad alSanhuris (18951971) Sharia Project and Its Misrepresentation in Egypt. 211 Friedhelm Hoffmann East Asia: Representations of Transfers of Democracy and Human Rights, Civilisation, and Love Transfer in Dispute: The Case of China. 263 Heiner Roetz The Global Diffusion of the Western Concept of Civilisation to Nineteenth Century Korea. 283 Young Sun Ha Importation of Love from Modern Europe to Korea. 299 Jungwoon Choi Notes on Contributors. 313 Index of Names and Places. 319

Autorenportrait

InhaltsangabeContents Acknowledgments. 7 Foreword: Representations and Transfers. 9 Hartmut Kaelble Cultural Transfers in Dispute: An Introduction. 15 Jörg Feuchter The Middle Ages: Representations of Transfers between Islam and Christianity Jewish or Islamic Influence? The Iconoclastic Controversy in Dispute. 41 Wolfram Drews Did the Medieval West Receive a 'Complete Model' of Education from Classical Islam? Reconsidering George Makdisi and His Thesis. 61 Tim Geelhaar Emperor Frederick II, 'Sultan of Lucera', 'Friend of the Muslims', Promoter of Cultural Transfer: Controversies and Suggestions. 85 Dorothea Weltecke Medieval Western Perceptions of Islam and the Scholars: What Went Wrong?. 107 Kristin Skottki Does the History of Medieval Political Thought Need a Spatial Turn? The Murals of Longthorpe, the Secretum secretorum and the Intercultural Transfer of Political Ideas in the High Middle Ages. 135 Bee Yun Between 'Core' and 'Periphery': Representations of Transfers of Fascism, Violence, and Law Western Representations of Fascist Influences on Islamist Thought. 149 JosephSimon Görlach Transfers, Formations, Transformations? Some Programmatic Notes on Fascism in India, c. 1922-1938. 167 Benjamin Zachariah Colonialism and Violence: Alleged Transfers and Political Instrumentalisation. 193 Andreas Weiß Legal Authenticity, Cultural Insulation and Undemocratic Rule: AbdalRazzaq Ahmad alSanhuris (18951971) Sharia Project and Its Misrepresentation in Egypt. 211 Friedhelm Hoffmann East Asia: Representations of Transfers of Democracy and Human Rights, Civilisation, and Love Transfer in Dispute: The Case of China. 263 Heiner Roetz The Global Diffusion of the Western Concept of Civilisation to Nineteenth Century Korea. 283 Young Sun Ha Importation of Love from Modern Europe to Korea. 299 Jungwoon Choi Notes on Contributors. 313 Index of Names and Places. 319

Leseprobe

Cultural Transfers in Dispute: An Introduction Jörg Feuchter [. ] there is no vantage outside the actuality of relationships among cultures, among unequal imperial and nonimperial powers, among us and others; no one has the epistemological privilege of somehow judging, evaluating, and interpreting the world free from the encumbering interests and engagements of the ongoing relationships themselves. We are, so to speak, of the connections, not outside and beyond them. Cultural Transfers in Dispute explores the role which representations of transfers play in the construction of cultural identities. Our conception of cultures and cultural change has altered dramatically in recent decades. In an era that describes itself as the 'global' or 'globalised' age, no longer do we understand cultures as isolated units, but rather as hybrid formations constantly engaged in a multidirectional process of exchange and influence with other cultures. Edward W. Said sums this up in his 1993 classic Culture and Imperialism: '[. ] the history of all cultures is the history of cultural borrowing.' This view is not only applied to formerly colonised or otherwise dominated civilisations, but to all, including Europe/the 'West'. Eurocentric views constructing a European singularity going back to antiquity and neglecting influences on Europe have long come under severe criticism, culminating in the allegation of a Theft of History (Jack Goody) from the rest of the world. As a result, research on transfers between cultures has become established as a comprehensive paradigm in the social sciences and humanities. Many recent trends in historiography like 'world system theory', '(new) global history', 'postcolonial studies', 'entangled history', 'connected histories', 'shared history ', 'histoire croisée', and 'transcultural history' are marked by their primary concern with phenomena of cultural exchange. They define themselves by the place they grant to cultural interconnectedness as a factor of history. This perspective marks a strong difference to older 'indigenist' views that privileged internal societal development and in which 'external factors have generally been seen as contingent'. Those focussing on transfer claim the opposite: That without taking into account cultural contacts one is not able to understand history. A milestone on the road from the indigenist to the externalist view was the publication in 1963 of William Hardy McNeill's The Rise of the West: A History of the Human Community which very much focussed on cultural exchanges and their effects on societies and was to become a standard textbook in academic history teaching on World Civilisation. Almost fifty years on, transfers between cultures past and present have come to be regarded as the rule rather than the exception, to the extent that the idea of clearly separable cultures is dissolving. As Peter Burke poignantly stated in 2009, today 'many of us are prepared to find hybridization almost everywhere in history' and accusations of cultural essentialism are rife. Transfer is thus at the centre of current academic and intellectual discussions about culture(s). Yet the present volume does not seek to simply add more case studies to the plethora of publications on cultural transfer. Nor does it set out to argue against the study of transfer. Its raison d'être is situated on a different level. Our aim is to contribute to transfer studies by suggesting a critical reflection on how cultural transfer is represented. For transfer phenomena, of all things, are not something that is simply 'revealed' or 'found'. Instead the production of knowledge about cultural transfer is, like all knowledge production, always itself subject to cultural, political and ideological conditions. These affect whether particular transfer phenomena are noticed at all, regarded positively or negatively, held to be more or less probable, completely denied

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